On the right bank of the Garonne river, mid-way between Pont Chaban-Delmas and Pont d’Aquitaine, ...

Jock: the Bordeaux family business whose “crème” is a Bordeaux family favourite

On the right bank of the Garonne river, mid-way between Pont Chaban-Delmas and Pont d’Aquitaine, the 70-strong workforce of an industrial plant is hard at work around the clock manufacturing products under the brand name Jock. The name is familiar to the citizens of Bordeaux and beyond, and the company is responsible for what is, for many, one of the most evocative foodstuffs of their childhood: “la crème Jock”.

The delicacy was created by biscuit-maker Raymond Boulesque in 1938 on Rue Bergeret in the central Bordeaux Capucins district. His aim had been to invent an inexpensive cereal-based foodstuff for children at a time when sugar was both hard to come by and costly. The end-product proved just as popular with adults, who enjoyed the crème as a dessert in its own right.

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Centre National Jean Moulin is a compact museum devoted to the Second World War that, despite its...

Centre National Jean Moulin: remembering the Second World War

Centre National Jean Moulin is a compact museum devoted to the Second World War that, despite its central location on Place Jean-Moulin, just off Place Pey-Berland, doesn’t always make it on to the list of to-see places for locals, let alone tourists.

The centre was created in 1967 under the aegis of the then mayor of Bordeaux, Jacques Chaban-Delmas. Since 1981, it has been housed in what used to be the premises of the Caisse d’Épargne bank, whose teams have since moved on to the Mériadeck quarter… and are soon set to move again to new quarters on the Garonne waterfront.

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Cité Frugès , also known as Les Quartiers Modernes Frugès , is a 1920s housing estate of particul...

Le Corbusier's Cité Frugès: timelessly modern and back in fashion

Cité Frugès, also known as Les Quartiers Modernes Frugès, is a 1920s housing estate of particular architectural and historical significance, and its 50 properties have slowly become a source of pride for the surrounding town of Pessac.

This unique venture was initially commissioned in 1924 by the local industrialist Henry Frugès (1879-1974), whose wealth had been built on the success of his sugar refinery business (later taken over by Béghin-Say, which ceased operations in Bordeaux in 1984). Frugès, who had already nurtured a reputation as a rich eccentric, as showcased by his spectacular residence on Place des Martyrs de la Résistance in central Bordeaux (still known as Hôtel Frugès), developed an ambitious plan to house his factory workers.

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